We’re human beings, you know.

We’re human beings, you know.

Photo by Nonsap Visuals on Unsplash

So, I feel as if someone lit a firecracker beneath me or something, because wow.  I am irritated.  I have been, dare I say, triggered.  I am not proud of being triggered, but unlike the left, I will try to be more constructive about it.  Hence this post.

Earlier this morning I came across this very interesting article at the New York Post entitled “This pro-America book could buck the left-wing YA trend” and it’s about a new book called Camp Valor, by Scott McEwan and Hof Williams.  It sounds pretty good and I’ll have to keep an eye out for it.  The article is pretty even and unbiased.  I discovered it at a YA subreddit that had quite a few comments, but I didn’t bother to look at those since I figured it would only piss me off.  Conservatives are generally unwelcome on Reddit, except for a handful of subreddits.

So it got me thinking about a book I read several years ago (eight years ago to be exact…thanks, Goodreads) called How Not to be Popular by Jennifer Ziegler.  It’s about a girl with hippies for parents.  She’s tired of moving around, because just when she’s getting settled, she has to move.  I totally understand that, because I moved around as a kid too.  So her plan is to do whatever it takes to be unpopular so that she doesn’t make any attachments.  It does not go well, and she ends up with friends and even a boyfriend who happens to be a Republican.

And, to my utter astonishment, her boyfriend Jack is a well-rounded character who challenges her.  He’s not a silly cartoon character (at some point I think he says he’s not a Republican but he never seemed liberal either).  He’s not some stupid anti-Christian stereotype.  He’s a real person, and I appreciated that so much.

So I looked it up on GoodReads.  I read through some of the reviews, looking for the inevitable liberal whine about how the Republican character wasn’t demonized or whatever, and I did indeed find that.  I updated my review with the following:

“I read this a long time ago, and just thought of it now. I’m surprised my rating is so low, but this book stayed with me for one reason: the Young Republican character is an actual human being, and not a cartoonish villain. This is incredibly rare in literature.

Thank you, author, for treating us Republicans like human beings.

And if you want to talk about appalling hypocrisy, let’s talk about how you climate change nutjobs continue to use resources and technology that’s (supposedly) killing the planet. Do you know how many gallons of water it takes to generate the electricity you use to spew your silly nonsense? If you really cared, you’d get rid of your computer and go live in the wilderness, but you don’t, because it’s all a bunch of nonsense.

Or, we can also talk about how nonviolent you all are, yet you dump urine on people you disagree with you whack your opponents in the head with bike locks, you express your desire to see a twelve year old boy locked in a cage full of pedophiles…but you’d better not criticize how the Obama girls are dressed at an official event! That’s racist.

I could spend the next four hundred years going on about how utterly hypocritical the left is, but I won’t live that long, and this text box will only accept so many characters. But, again, I’d like to thank the author for writing an actual story and not two hundred pages of bullshit liberal talking points.”

I was so angry at this one reviewer mentioning the hoary old canard about “Republican” hypocrisy that I just had to make a post.

I was going to address the points the idiot reviewer made, but I don’t want to now.  I have already covered this whole hypocrisy thing anyway.

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